Code Smells: Javascript Min()

Summary: This blog post discusses javascript min(), a javascript function that is used to find the minimum of two values. The min() function takes in two arguments which are then compared and returned as the lessor value if they are not equal. The javascript min() function can be used when working with arrays or strings, but it cannot be used on objects.

In this blog post, we will discuss some code smells related to min().

What is JavaScript min()?

Description: In javascript, Math.min() is a function that takes in two values and returns the smaller of the two. This can be used when working with arrays or strings, but it cannot be used on objects. When using javascript to find minimums for an array, there will likely not a good way to do so without recursion.

Syntax:

Math.min(num, num)

Arguments: The min() function takes in two arguments which are then compared and returned as the lessor value if they are not equal.

Returns: The min() function will return the smaller of the two arguments.

Example:

var myArray1 = ["1", "2"]; 

 Math.min(myArray[0], myArray[1]) //returns 'one'

A min() code smell is that there is no intuitive way to find the minimum when using javascript. It can be done, but it will likely require recursion or some other complex algorithm in order to do so.

Where we can use Javascript Math min()?

The min() can be used when working with arrays or strings, but it cannot be used on objects. When using javascript to find minimums for an array, there will likely not a good way to do so without recursion.

Some code smells related to Javascript Math min():

– Bad Smell: When working with javascript, it is important that your recursive functions are not nested too deeply or you could run into troubles when trying to execute them.

Solution: We can use something like a stack so that we can remember where to return when the function is done.

– Bad Smell: When javascript Math min() recursion functions are nested too deeply, it may cause an infinite loop that will slow down or crash a program.

Solution: Use something like a stack instead of recursion and use a for-loop so that you know at what level you are in the min() function.

– Bad Smell: When javascript is used for loops, it’s helpful to know what number of times a loop needs to be executed so that you can end at an expected time and not get caught up in an infinite loop.

Solution: We could use something like arrays or a counter to help javascript Math min() keep track of the number of times it needs to iterate.

– Bad Smell: When javascript is used for loops, it’s helpful to know what number of times a loop needs to be executed so that you can end at an expected time and not get caught up in an infinite loop.

Solution: We could use something like arrays or a counter to help javascript Math.min() keep track of the number of times it needs to iterate.

– Bad Smell: When javascript is used for loops, it’s helpful to know what number of times a loop needs to be executed so that you can end at an expected

conclusion:

We’ll explore the meaning of code smells, what they are and how to identify them in JavaScript and React JS applications. We will also show you some common examples from our Code Smells: Javascript Min guide so that you can start identifying your own code smell! 

If we want to write clean, well-structured, maintainable software it is important for us as developers to recognize when there is a problem with our application’s design or logic flow. Luckily there are many tools out there like JSLint which help us find these problems before they become too big an issue. It may take time initially but once we get into the habit of looking for code smells in our code, it becomes easier.

Also Read: Javascript Foreach: Working with Arrays

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